Euroka

5 Brookville Road, Toorak VIC 3142

Architect: Carr

Interiors: Carr

Builder: VCON

Inspired by the subtle geometry and rich texture of neo-brutalist architecture, the project strives to create a simple, honest, and functional building that accompanies its purpose, inhabitants, and location. The site is nestled in a streetscape of 1-3 story buildings. Notably, the immediate context consists of dwellings setback behind landscaped yards, raised above street level upon the sloping topography with verandahs a strong element of the architectural expression to the street.

By recessing the third floor, the proposed scheme seeks to present a 2-story form to Brookville Road. The second floor is articulated with a sandblasted concrete colonnade capturing large terraces and living spaces. Deep sculptural planters provide privacy to occupants and add a softening and variation to the built form presented to the street. In all the scheme emulates the conditions of the existing neighbouring buildings in a contemporary form.

 

Adding further interest to the street a textured board marked fence setback for landscaping opportunities opens to a wide centralised pedestrian access path. A 16m long reflection pool runs along one edge of this path, extending from the footpath into the lobby adding drama to this journey. Inbuilt planters and openings in the slab at the top level above terraces further dissolves and softens the form. The material palette of blackened metalwork and textured concrete provides soft tones in line with the rendered fabric of the existing context and provides a backdrop for the significant landscaping. At each level, the connection with private open space and landscaping is considered with large deep terraces above ground and wide sliding and pivot doors at this junction.

The Brookville interior design draws inspiration from the work of Modernist icons Roy Grounds, Robin Boyd and Philip Johnson whose classic geometry and focus on integrating the inside and outside have allowed us to develop a harmonic flow between the private and shared spaces, and surrounding landscape, with functionality as a primary consideration.
The Rockefeller Guest House by Philip Johnson has inspired us to treat the apartments as private galleries. Plinths running the length of the master bedroom, as well as kitchen, dining and living spaces create a consistent look and function throughout the residence, on which inhabitants can showcase their personalities, art, and narratives within the space.

The robust materiality from the architectural brief has been translated through the material selection in the interiors. The expansive use of a limited selection of materials creates the right canvas for residents to bring their stories and personalities into the space, creating a harmonious juxtaposition of the timber, metal, and natural stone.